Sri Lanka holds mock election to test virus measures


Fortune’s 50 greatest leaders of 2015
9 celebrities who do their own makeup and are ridiculously good at it
A voter (L) casts his vote during a mock election to test the guidelines implemented against the COVID-19 coronavirus in Ingiriya of Kalutara District in Western Province on June 14, 2020. – Sri Lanka will hold parliamentary elections on August 5, more than three months late because of the coronavirus, the election commission said June 10 after health authorities gave their approval. A mock election will be held this weekend to test new health measures that will be implemented at polling booths and counting centres, commission chairman Mahinda Deshapriya said. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP) (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI/AFP via Getty Images)
A voter (L) casts his vote during a mock election to test the guidelines implemented against the COVID-19 coronavirus in Ingiriya of Kalutara District in Western Province on June 14, 2020. – Sri Lanka will hold parliamentary elections on August 5, more than three months late because of the coronavirus, the election commission said June 10 after health authorities gave their approval. A mock election will be held this weekend to test new health measures that will be implemented at polling booths and counting centres, commission chairman Mahinda Deshapriya said. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP) (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI/AFP via Getty Images)
Sri Lanka staged a mock election on Sunday to test measures aimed at preventing the spread of the coronavirus during a parliamentary vote in August.

The poll was due to be held on April 25 but was put off and then postponed indefinitely due to the epidemic, which official figures show has infected nearly 2,000 people and killed 11.
The election commission said Wednesday the vote would be held on August 5.
The island nation of 21 million people has steadily lifted its lockdown restrictions, although a night curfew remains.
The new health measures — to be implemented at polling booths and counting centres — were trialled in four of the 22 electoral districts, commission chairman Mahinda Deshapriya told reporters.
“We were very pleased to see that all those who volunteered to take part in this exercise today wore face masks,” he said.
“Officials and polling agents will be behind clear plastic screens or wear face shields. We have also ensured that voters will stand a metre apart when they queue up.”
Voters will also be required to bring their own pen or pencil to mark ballot papers.
President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, who won a landslide at November’s presidential polls, has been hoping the parliamentary vote would secure his party a two-thirds majority and give him sweeping powers to govern the nation.
Related slideshow: Aerial views of cities as they ease COVID-19 lockdown restrictions (Provided by Photo Services)
Stay Ahead with Digital Business Banking Solutions
24/7 Online Support. If Business Never Stops, Why Should We?
Enjoy free delivery with minimum order of S$40
Slide 1 of 22: Aerial view showing the Via Simon Bolivar or Transistmica Highway, in Panama City, on May 31, 2020. – Panama’s government reopened on Monday the construction, non-metallic mining and industry sectors, which were inactive to combat covid-19, in an attempt to “avoid the economic collapse” of the country with the largest number of infections in Central America. (Photo by Luis ACOSTA / AFP) (Photo by LUIS ACOSTA/AFP via Getty Images)
1/22 SLIDES © Luis Acosta/AFP via Getty Images
Some major cities around the world have started to reopen their businesses and allow people more freedom of movement following weeks of strict lockdown measures aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19. Though restrictions are being lifted, albeit in a phased manner, rules regarding social distancing and some necessary precautions continue to remain in place.
(Pictured) The Transistmica highway in Panama City, Panama, is seen on May 31. Panama’s government reopened construction, non-metallic mining and industry sectors, which were inactive to combat COVID-19, on June 1 in an attempt to “avoid the economic collapse” of the country.
Access cash when you need it the most
TPMS Tool